OsmoLax Clinical evidence

The active ingredient in OsmoLax is macrogol 3350. Macrogol laxatives have been extensively tested including 20 randomised, controlled clinical trials in adults (3350 and 4000)1 and 15 trials conducted in children (3350 and 4000) with constipation.2

Macrogol 3350 is a clinically proven treatment for constipation that is well tolerated in both adults and children. 1,2,3 Overall macrogol laxatives are more effective than lactulose in adults and are generally better tolerated.1 Most studies are of short duration, but evidence includes trials that have evaluated the use of macrogol laxatives for up to 12 months.

Good Evidence

Macrogol laxatives are clinically proven – with the greatest amount of clinical evidence amongst OTC laxatives.3

ADULTS: A first step for adults with constipation

Macrogol with or without electrolytes are clinically proven and are the most effective laxatives amongst the osmotic laxatives1,3

Network meta-analysis confirms that the addition of electrolytes to macrogols does not provide any additional clinical benefits in the relief of constipation in adults1

The use of macrogol laxatives in adults is considered a first step after bulking-forming agents (e.g. psyllium).

CHILDREN: First-line in children with constipation

Macrogol with or without electrolytes are clinically proven and are more effective than lactulose3,4

Network meta-analysis confirms that the addition of electrolytes to macrogols does not provide any additional clinical benefits in the relief of constipation in children2

Macrogol laxatives are considered first line in children if simple lifestyle measures don't help.

OsmoLax – the benefit of no added electrolytes

Macrogol without added electrolytes is easy to give because it is a virtually tasteless and odourless powder that can be mixed in the person’s drink of choice1,4

Macrogol without electrolytes has better palatability and this may influence patient compliance1,2,4

 

References:

1. Katelaris P, Naganathan V, Liu K, Krassas G, Gullotta J. Comparison of the effectiveness of polyethylene glycol with and without electrolytes in constipation: a systematic review and network meta-analysis. BMC Gastroenterol 2016; 16:42.

2. Krassas G, Gullotta J, Katelaris P, Naganathan V, Liu K, Cranswick N. Polyethylene glycols with or without electrolytes for constipation. in children: A network meta-analysis . GP16 Abstract 67. 2016.

3. Pare P, Fedorak RN. Systematic review of stimulant and nonstimulant laxatives for the treatment of functional constipation. Can J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2014; 28(10):549-557.

4. Alper A, Pashankar DS. Polyethylene glycol: a game-changer laxative for children. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2013; 57(2):134-140.

Always read the label. Follow the directions for use. If symptoms persist, talk to your health professional.